Lisa and Jim's Northern Nevada Real Estate Blog: Well Logs in Nevada And Their Importance

Well Logs in Nevada And Their Importance

Well Logs in Nevada And Their Importance  

If you are buying a home that gets its water from a domestic well, or looking at a vacant lot that involves the drilling of a well, you should get either the subject well log or, in the case of a lot without an existing well, well logs for surrounding properties that will give you an idea of what you can expect in your well drilling endeavor. It is a statutory requirement that every well drilled in the State of Nevada have a log of the well drilling filed by the well driller with the Water Resources division of the Department of Conservation and Natural Resources.  The original well logs are kept in one area at that office and are available to the public for inspection and copying. 

If you go to the Water Resources office to inspect your well log you will need the township, range and section of the parcel you are working with.  You can get that information from your deed, or online at the Douglas County Assessor's office website, co.douglas.nv.us/databases/assessors/ (find your parcel number then pull up your parcel map).  If it is a newer well you might be able to find it with an accurate address or County Assessor's Parcel Number.  Names can also help if you know who owned the property when the well was drilled.  

It gets a bit tricky with older wells as the well drillers weren't always accurate with identifying the location, and the wells were occasionally filed in the name of the well driller, not the owner.  If you don't find the log you are seeking exactly where it should be, try going up/down in the township or range number, or moving to an adjacent section number.  In our research we've found many well logs in that manner and there really is no apparent explanation for their misidentification or placement in the State records. 

Good news for the computer savvy.  You can get well logs online at the Water Resources website, http://water.nv.gov/engineering/wlog/wlog.cfm, or simply go to www.water.nv.gov and click on the well log database icon.  You will find many different ways to find your well log, name, township/range/section, Parcel Number, etc.  It can take some work, but with patience and effort you can usually find what you are looking for in the comfort of your home/office. 

Our Advice:  It is important that you know the physical structure of your domestic well.  The log will tell you the depth of your well, how much perforated pipe was installed in your well, the depth of the seal, static water level, types of soils encountered, casing diameter, pumping data, i.e.- draw down, volume, etc.  A 350 foot well is much more expensive to drill and operate than a 140 feet deep well.  Wells drilled in rocky earth can be more expensive than those drilled in sandy soil.  You can anticipate such additional expenses by looking at the soils report portion of the well log. You will not find water quality information, but you'll have a good understanding of the structure of your "straw".  Your agent can help you acquire the necessary well log(s) for your real estate situation. 

When you live with a well you are your own "water company".  Be sure you understand what equipment you have and the quality of the water you are providing yourself for consumption.  When it comes to choosing professionals to assist you with your real estate needs... Experience is Priceless!  Lisa Wetzel & Jim Valentine, CDPE, SFR, RE/MAX Realty Affiliates, 775-781-5472.  carsonvalleyland@hotmail.com, www.carsonvalleyland.com

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Lisa Wetzel and Jim Valentine are the authors of this blog.  Lisa, Jim  and Jessie are experts in Carson Valley , Carson City and the tri-county area of Douglas County , Carson City and Lyon County.  Call our team anytime at 775-781-5472 or 775-781-3704.  To Search for Homes go to: Carson Valley Listing Book  or visit our website at www.CarsonValleyLand.com

Comment balloon 2 commentsLisa Wetzel • July 20 2010 06:30PM

Comments

This is another example of why people need local professionals in a real estate transaction!

Posted by Associate Broker Falmouth MA Cape Cod Heath Coker, Heath Coker Robert Paul Properties Falmouth MA (http://www.CapeGroup.com & http://www.REindex.com) almost 9 years ago

Heath ... You are so spot on!  Thanks for the response!

Posted by Lisa Wetzel, CDPE, SFR carsonvalleyland.com (RE/MAX Realty Affiliates) almost 9 years ago

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